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Book Synopsis

As two-thirds of Americans struggle with being overweight or obese, nothing has worked to take off the pounds. Diet plans, Food Pyramid Guidelines, package nutritional labelling, and five-a-day fruit & vegetable programs have all failed to arrest America’s increasing girth.

Now there is a solution.

Unlike polemics that simply rail against the food industry, Stuffed: An Insider’s Look at Who’s (Really) Making America Fat offers a behind-the-scenes examination of the business of food and uncovers the hidden roadblocks to solving the obesity dilemma: misguided food company practices, failed government regulations, misleading food pundit arguments, and confused and overwhelmed consumers.

Authored by former food executive turned anti-obesity exponent Hank Cardello, Stuffed breaks new ground by demonstrating how food companies’ defensive mindsets that they offer healthy options and that the consumer is responsible for what they eat, have largely ignored their customers in the name of their bottom lines. And so consumers have been cajoled to purchase “convenience” foods, super-sized beverages and high-calorie Weapons of Mass Consumption because they sweeten profits.

But Cardello makes clear that the food corporations shouldn’t take all of the blame. They are merely a cog in a larger system that’s broken, and here Cardello illuminates how the government and the media have only made it harder for Americans to make nutritious choices. Highlighting both bit players and high-profile voices of change, Cardello explains the fundamental risks to one-size-fits-all regulatory solutions, and the bigger dangers posed by letting the food pundits obfuscate the health conversation.

More than simply an chronicle of how we got here, Stuffed puts forth a compelling blueprint for the future: food companies are the only ones who can solve the obesity crisis and must now make their profits more responsibly by taking custodianship over their customer’s well-being. He provides novel but concrete steps food companies can take to fatten their profits while slimming down their customers. In addition, he stresses the realistic role that consumers must play in America’s new health equation, explaining that unless they demand healthier food with their wallets, America will continue to tip the scales for years to come.

Provocative and groundbreaking, Stuffed is a sweeping critique of excessive food consumption in America, one that uncovers the money behind the calories and presents a fresh vision for building health back into the lives of ordinary Americans.

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